Myth and Magic: Queer Fairy Tales, edited by Radclyffe

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Editor’s website | Publisher’s website
Publication date – December 16, 2014

Summary: Myth, magic, and monsters—the stuff of childhood dreams (or nightmares) and adult fantasies.

Delve into these classic fairy tales retold with a queer twist and surrender to the world of seductive spells and dark temptations.

Thoughts: I’m not sure whether to call this my usual kind of reading fare or not. On one hand, it’s got a heavy romantic slant, sometimes outright porny, which usually isn’t what I’m looking for in a book and indeed tend to stay away from. On other other hand, it does mix two other elements that I’m very interested in: fairy tale retellings, and a non-heteronormative focus. I figured if nothing else, it was worth giving it a read, so I could broaden my horizons and see more characters who weren’t always straight-by-default.

I wasn’t disappointed. Some of the stories in here were damn good, and I wished a few times that romance was more to my taste because there are a few authors whose writing style and skill with words make me want to see more of what they can do. And it was great to see gay characters get some time in the spotlight, because, as I’ve become so aware of relative recently, this isn’t something that happens spectacularly often. So when it does happen, especially when it intersects with another of my interests, I want to show support and spread the word.

And there are some amazing stories to be found in Myth and Magic, too. A Hero in Hot Pink Boots didn’t go the way I expected, but it was still a good story and an interesting take on Alice in Wonderland in a modern setting. With street brawls and confidence boosters. Bad Girls riffed on the Disney versions of a couple of fairy tales, the sanitized versions most of us know from our childhoods, and made me chuckle a few times at the references. Goldie and the Three Bears was a retelling of, well, Goldilocks and the Three Bears, only with a noir feel and the setting of grimy streets and a pick-up bar.

But my favourite story of all was The Snow King, a retelling of The Snow Queen with a gay male couple instead of siblings, and while there was some dubious consent going on there, it was still a beautifully-written story that I could read a few times in a row and not get tired of.

Most of the stories had a fantasy setting, befitting the original versions of the stories they were retelling, but others were more modern. Some, like Riding Red, seemed to blend the two in strange ways, and I wasn’t quite sure of the setting even though the story itself was otherwise clear. I was surprised that I enjoyed the ones with modern settings as much as I did, given my preference for fantasy. I think that’s a testament to the authors and their skill, really, since any author that can make you enjoy stepping outside of your comfort zone clearly has some talent to speak of.

I’m sure some people are surprised to see me rate this collection so highly, given my general dislike for heavy romantic themes. Honestly, if I brought that into play, this book probably would have only been 3 stars. It may have featured some good stories, but in general, they’re not stories that are typically to my taste. But for me to rate the book down because of that would be akin to me buying something from a bakery and then demanding my money back because I’ve never liked bread. I’m not going to fault the book for being something I know isn’t my cup of tea. I knew that when I started reading it. So in trying to be objective, I’m also trying to ignore that part of myself and focus on the quality of the stories, and the stories that were told, rather than the genre they’re told in.

Though while some stories were good, some were less so, and it often came down to characters doing things that made no sense. In Heartless, a character rescues her girlfriend from the Snow Queen and randomly knows that stabbing the Snow Queen with a rose will not only destroy her power but give her the heart she’s lacking. It seemed utterly random and nonsensical, one of those quick ways of ending a story when you have no idea how it’s actually supposed to end. Some stories, such as my favourite The Snow King, featured dubious consent along the lines of, “No, really, you should sleep with me because it’s for the greater good and will save your partner.” Or things that seem right out of a porno, like two people meeting and immediately falling into bed because… a magic harp’s song was making them horny, I think, thought that really wasn’t explained very well in the text, and I’m reading between the lines to even get that far with an explanation.

What you get out of this really depends on what you go in expecting. If you’re looking for some quick stories with gay protagonists and some hot porn-in-prose, then absolutely, this is a book worth checking out. If you’re looking for darker fairy tale retellings, or something with a greater emphasis on story rather than love and sex, then you won’t really find that in Myth and Magic. I prefer the latter to the former, but again, I knew that wasn’t what I was going to get right from the outset, and I’m rating this on what it was rather than what I knew it wasn’t. It’s not a book for everyone. But I suspect those who enjoy romance and a little hot action in their stories will find this collection quite enjoyable.

(Received for review from the publisher.)

4 comments on “Myth and Magic: Queer Fairy Tales, edited by Radclyffe

  1. Hummmmmm, sounds like a fun read. You said this was a book of gay protagonists but also mentioned a story about a woman and her girlfriend higher up – were they secondary characters, or are there lesbian/bi-girl protagonists too?

    • I don’t recall any bi characters, but there were definitely lesbian characters. I tend to use ‘gay’ to mean ‘homosexual, regardless of gender,’ which I think may be a bit of a regional thing since I’ve noticed far more people use ‘gay’ to refer specifically to homosexual males.

  2. Pingback: November in Retrospect | Bibliotropic

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