Closer to Home, by Mercedes Lackey

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Publication date – October 24, 2014

Summary: Mags was once an enslaved orphan living a harsh life in the mines, until the King’s Own Herald discovered his talent and trained him as a spy. Now a Herald in his own right, at the newly established Heralds’ Collegium, Mags has found a supportive family, including his Companion Dallen.

Although normally a Herald in his first year of Whites would be sent off on circuit, Mags is needed close to home for his abilities as a spy and his powerful Mindspeech gift. There is a secret, treacherous plot within the royal court to destroy the Heralds. The situation becomes dire after the life of Mags’ mentor, King’s Own Nikolas, is imperiled. His daughter Amily is chosen as the new King’s Own, a complicated and dangerous job that is made more so by this perilous time. Can Mags and Amily save the court, the Heralds, and the Collegium itself?

Thoughts: Even though I wasn’t exactly thrilled with the last 5-book Valdemar set, figuring that it could have been cut down to 4 books if there weren’t as many long descriptions of sports games or copy-and-past flashbacks from previous books, I still knew that I was going to end up reading the latest book in the very large series, Closer to Home. It was still a Valdemar novel, and even if some of the stories haven’t impressed me, the world probably always will. As with the Collegium Chronicles books, Closer to Home still centres largely around Mags, with the addition of more chapters from Amily’s viewpoint, which was good to see as a bit of variation.

There’s a bit of a double meaning going on with the title. Closer to Home represents both how Mags and Amily are a step closer to settling into their lives and roles as adults and finding themselves at peace with the situation, and also incorporates the struggle of handling problems at your doorstep instead of the far-flung or nation-wide issues that were the focus of previous novels. ‘Potential’ is the name of the game, as this book deals very much with the role of women in Haven and through Valdemaran society in general, and whether or not their wants are determined by actual personal desire or by ignorance of anything else. It’s a complex issue, one that sometimes it seems Lackey is trying to present as complex while also trying to simplify it to an either-or debate. The argument came down to a lot of agreeing that much of it was determined by upbringing and awareness of potential, with also a lot of shrugging and saying, “You can’t win ’em all,” when it came to actually doing anything about those views. Given that it took the intervention of the King to stop one man from marrying off a daughter who didn’t want to marry and to make sure she got additional education that might awaken interest in other avenues, it’s clear that the society has a long way to go.

It does, to its benefit, ask some of the hard questions. Aside from asking why women can’t do things that men do, or why they’re only treated as marriage prospects, it also addresses class difference, asking why common workers don’t get the same benefits afforded highborns when it comes to rights and privilege. It was a question that ultimately had no answer, except to say that it was simply a matter of time and resources; there weren’t enough people with enough eyes on the comings and goings of everyday folk whereas the rich and titled had eyes on them all the time, so what they did was more visible and easier to address. It’s an unsatisfactory answer, but to its credit, it was realistic for the setting, and at least the question was asked, openly and boldly, instead of being hinted at vaguely and hoping that someone, somewhere, would pay attention to it.

Looking at this book on its own, out of context from the series whole, it could easily be taken that the book is trying to just handwave a serious issue by declaring, “Eh, we can save a few but not all, and that’s good enough for now.” And I suspect that a lot of people probably got annoyed at that. In context with the rest of the series, however, and keeping in mind that this book takes place far in the past of the main Valdemar stories, I’m tempted to forgive it this sin. As the world’s timeline advances, great societal changes get made. It would be like getting angry at a historical fiction novel for portraying history accurately. There’s a certain amount of allowance that I think can be made, even if the attitude and behaviour of many characters is difficult to swallow.

And by difficult to swallow, I do mean difficult. There’s a scene that can essentially come across as rape apology. A 14 year old girl sends a besotted love letter to a handsome man she’s only ever seen the once, and when it gets found out, she’s dressed dow quite fiercely by someone who tells her, in no uncertain terms, that the guy could have raped her and the law could do nothing if that letter was brought into play because clearly she threw herself at him. Despite the fact that Heralds can literally tell when somebody is lying, and despite the fact that in a previous book that appears chronologically before this one it was said that Heralds accept mental and emotional evidence in crimes, no no, the law could do nothing because a girl sent a letter saying she loved a guy from the moment she saw him, so that apparently means all sex is okay.

Yes, this scene raised my blood pressure. I can’t give that one a pass, because while it may be how people think a lot of the time, it grated against what has been established time and again in the Valdemar novels, which are largely about hope and improvement and how anyone can be something great and so long as justice can be done it will be done.

When it comes to the story, though, I can’t say that much about it. Most of it was a Romeo and Juliet retelling with a sick twist, though that sick twist doesn’t really get revealed until after a few eye-rolls at the way the story was mirroring Romeo and Juliet so closely. It’s a story that requires patience, given that it seems at first to be rather unoriginal and trite. And very little really develops outside of one mystery being solved and a few characters adjusting to their new roles in life. The story seems to be mostly a backdrop against which questions of social justice can be asked, the solid story being an unimportant prop for nebulous “what if”s. Which isn’t a bad thing, necessarily, but if you’re like me, who spent years reading Valdemar novels for tales of epic adventure, it would be a bit disappointing.

Lackey’s smooth writing style does make up for a lot of that, though, since I’ve always found her storytelling to be as welcoming as a hot bath on a cold night. You sink into it and you get so lost in it all that you don’t notice the passage of time. Her novels are 99% of the time such fun that the writing itself covers up a multitude of minor sins, and since I started reading her in my teen years, it always brings with it a sense of comfortable nostalgia that draws me back every time, not just to read whatever new story she’s written but also to experience the storytelling.

In the end, I have to say that while Closer to Home had its problems and I wouldn’t recommend it for someone who hasn’t read previous Valdemar novels, I still enjoyed it and I’m curious to see how the rest of the books in this branch of the series will go. Some plot threads regarding Mags are still dangling (though I’m starting to suspect I may be the only one who’s noticed them…), and Amily’s new role as the King’s Own has the potential to give rise to some interesting stories. Hopefully they’ll just be a bit more exciting next time around.

4 comments on “Closer to Home, by Mercedes Lackey

  1. Oh gosh I so agree! Whatever happened to Mag’s mysteries? After all the suspense we hear a tiny smidge about them in ‘Bastion’ and then everybody just dusts off their coats and goes ‘oh well, that’s that sorted’. I was really a bit upset by the ‘party at the manor’ scene. Come on, could that not have been twisted just a little? Evidently not.

    I feel the same though, love the Valdemar series for the familiarity and the immersion. but I’m increasingly feeling like I’m being taken advantage of. I might just go and re-read the ‘Arrows’ or ‘Magics’ trilogies instead of buying a new book.

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  3. On the rape apology issue, there is one nitpick. The dressing down that she got wasn’t focused so much on the legal viewpoint, as the societal view, that is, that even if he was found guilty of rape, by the courts, she would still be ruined socially, because at this point in the timeline the Heralds still don’t have the moral currency with the populace, especially the nobility, to sway the actions of the nobles and save her reputation… And since we still have victim shaming in this supposedly enlightened day and age, that is nothing to fault the characters on…

    • It was mostly on the social viewpoint, absolutely, but she brought the legal view in by saying that the law woulld be able to do nothing because she “clearly” threw herself at him. Which sounds an awful lot like reports of police dismissing rape claims because the women raped were dressed attractively, which of course means they must have been acting for it. Heralds may not have been able to recover her social standing in such a case, but given that in Magic’s Pawn it was established that Heralds accept mental evidence, that still should be grounds for charging him with a crime if he did rape her. Doubly so because of things like Truth Spell; they’d be able to tell, without a doubt, whether any sex was consenting or not.

      This is all hypothetical, of course, since that didn’t actually happen, but that was part of my issue with it. It was all hypothetical, and the hypothesis went against what Heralds were already established to do. There was a large social element, and I agree that her social standing would have been destroyed in such a case, but the law was brought into admonishment, so I felt the need to address why is was BS even by what Lackey has established in books that fall previously on the timeline.

      Maybe it was all bluff and bluster, trying to exagerate to make a point and scare her into silence. But normally that sort of thing is expressed in subsequent scenes (Lackey has a tendency to spell things out multiple times so that no points are missed), and it never was. If that was the intent, then she missed the chance to say so.

      “And since we still have victim shaming in this supposedly enlightened day and age, that is nothing to fault the characters on…”

      Actually, that’s EVERYTHING to fault the characters on. The fact that we still have way too many issues of victim shaming in the real worlds isn’t carte blanche to justify it in fiction. If real people would bear blame for shaming a victim, then so to should characters. That’s like saying it’s okay to be racist because other people are racist. That argument holds no water.

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